Molybdenum

Molybdenum is an important trace mineral. Good food sources of molybdenum include: beans, lentils, grains, and nuts.1 The 100% Daily Value (based on 2000 kcal diet) for Molybdenum is 75 µg,but it has been revised to 45 μg as of May 27, 2016.The 100% Daily Value for pregnant or lactating women is 50 μg, effective as of July 26, 2018.8

Forms

  • Molybdenum Yeast: Molybdenum yeast is a natural source of organically bound molybdenum. It is prepared by growing nutritional yeast cells in a molybdenum-rich medium. Molybdenum is incorporated into the protein structure of the yeast cells, which are harvested and dried.

Major Health Benefits

Molybdenum is a component of many enzymes in the body that are necessary for chemical reactions in order to maintain normal body function and for normal growth and development.3,4 Molybdenum also acts as an antioxidant.4

Cautions

The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) of Molybdenum is 2,000 µg per day. 5 Excessive intake of Molybdenum over a short period of time may cause visual and auditory hallucinations as well as seizures.6 Chronic excessive intake of Molybdenum may include symptoms similar to those of gout: inflammation and pain in bones and joints as well as formation of kidney stones.7

References

  1. Higdon, J. Molybdenum. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University. 2001. (Reviewed by Mendel, R. in 2013) (Food Sources). http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/molybdenum Accessed 7/2015.
  2. US Food and Drug Administration. Guidance for Industry: A Food Labeling Guide (14. Appendix F: Calculate the Percent Daily Value for the Appropriate Nutrients). US Department of Health and Human Services. 2013 January.
  3. Higdon, J. Molybdenum. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University. 2001. (Reviewed by Mendel, R. in 2013) (Summary)
  4. European Food Safety Authority. Scientific Opinion on Molybdenum Health Benefits. EFSA Journal 2010; 8(10): 1745.1.
  5. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs): Tolerable Upper Intake Levels, Elements. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, The National Academic Press. 2001. (PDF available)
  6. Momcilović B. A case report of acute human molybdenum toxicity from a dietary molybdenum supplement–a new member of the “Lucor metallicum” family. Arh Hig Rada Toksikol. 1999 Sep;50(3):289-97. PubMed PMID: 10649845.
  7. Higdon, J. Molydenum. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University. 2001. (Reviewed by Mendel, R. in 2013) (Safety)
  8. US Food and Drug Administration. Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels. US Department of Health and Human Services. Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 103, p. 33982 / May 27, 2016. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-27/pdf/2016-11867.pdf