Boron

Boron is a trace mineral found in bone and other tissues throughout the body. Good food sources of boron include: avocados, peanut butter, peanuts, coffee, apples, dried beans, and grape juice.1

Forms

Major Health Benefits

Boron, along with other minerals, plays important roles in healthy bones and help to prevent bone loss.2 Boron contributes to maintaining healthy joints and brain. It is suggested that adequate intake of boron may aid in performance tasks such as: short term memory, attention, and hand-eye coordination.3 Some preclinical studies reported that adequate intake of boron may prevent embryonic defects, suggesting that boron may have a role in reproduction and development.4 Boron may also aid in the metabolism of calcium and magnesium as well as cell membrane function.5

Cautions

The Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Boron consumed in one day is 20 mg.6 Exceeding the recommended daily maximum may cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea as well as skin flushing or convulsion.7

References

  1. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. The National Academic Press. 2001. http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10026/dietary-reference-intakes-for-vitamin-a-vitamin-k-arsenic-boron-chromium-copper-iodine-iron-manganese-molybdenum-nickel-silicon-vanadium-and-zinc (pp. 512)2.
  2. Zofková I, Nemcikova P, Matucha P. Trace elements and bone health. Clin Chem Lab Med. 2013 Aug;51(8):1555-61. PMID: 23509220.
  3. Penland JG. The importance of boron nutrition for brain and psychological function. Biol Trace Elem Res. 1998 Winter;66(1-3):299-317. PMID: 10050926.
  4. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. The National Academic Press. 2001 (pp. 510).
  5. National Research Council. Recommended Dietary Allowances: 10th Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 1989 (pp. 267)
  6. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. The National Academic Press. 2001 (pp. 502-503)
  7. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. The National Academic Press. 2001. (pp. 514)