Biotin

Biotin (vitamin B7) is an essential water-soluble B vitamin that is formulated from the organic acid, fumaric acid. Good food sources of biotin are yeast, whole wheat breads, liver and eggs.1 The 100% Daily Value of Biotin (based on 2,000 kcal diet) is 300 micrograms (µg),but it has been revised to 30 μg as of May 27, 2016.The 100% Daily Value for pregnant or lactating women is 35 μg, effective as of July 26, 2018.6

Major Health Benefits

Biotin functions in the metabolism of fats, proteins (amino acids), and carbohydrates. Biotin contributes to normal nervous system and psychological functions.3,4 Biotin also contributes to many important physiological functions in the body including: maintaining normal hair, skin, and mucous membranes.3,4

Deficiency of biotin is known to cause neurological symptoms in adults such as: depression, lethargy, as well as numbness and tingling in the hands and feet.5 Inadequate consumption of biotin can include symptoms such as: hair loss, scaly red rash around the eyes, nose, mouth, and genital area.5

References

  1. Higdon, J. Biotin. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University. 2000. (Reviewed by Mock, D, in 2008) (Food Sources) http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/biotin Accessed 7/2015.
  2. US Food and Drug Administration. Guidance for Industry: A Food Labeling Guide (14. Appendix F: Calculate the Percent Daily Value for the Appropriate Nutrients). US Department of Health and Human Services. 2013 January. http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm064928.htm
  3. European Food Safety Authority. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to biotin and energy-yielding metabolism, macronutrient metabolism, maintenance of skin and mucous membranes, maintenance of hair and function of the nervous system. EFSA Journal 2009;7(9):1209.
  4. European Food Safety Authority. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to biotin and maintenance of normal skin and mucous membranes, maintenance of normal hair, maintenance of normal bone, maintenance of normal teeth, maintenance of normal nails reduction of tiredness and fatigue, contribution to normal psychological functions and contribution to normal macronutrient metabolism. EFSA Journal 2010;8(10):1728.
  5. Higdon, J. Biotin. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University. 2000. (Reviewed by Mock, D in 2009) (Deficiency)
  6. US Food and Drug Administration. Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels. US Department of Health and Human Services. Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 103, p. 33982 / May 27, 2016. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-27/pdf/2016-11867.pdf